SOC234 2017 Lab11 – Shoalhaven

Dear SOC234 Lab,

Please respond to the following question with a reply-post of no more than 250 words:

‘What are the key principles and challenges of ethical research?”

Remember that you will need to post your reply before Lab 11, and don’t forget to look at both the instructions for Tweeting and Blogging and the Lab and Lecture Guide, both up on Moodle.

Thanks and good luck, Roger.

#S234UOW17  #Lab11  #Shoal

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4 Comments

  1. When conducting research involving humans, and given the power imbalance between researcher and participants, it is imperative that the researcher employs ethical principles and values (ed. Walter 2010, p.116). General guidance is provided by instruments like the Nuremberg Code and the National Statement on Ethical Conduct in Research Involving Humans, but consideration must be given to the methodology with qualitative research giving rise to more ethical considerations than quantitative research, organisational requirements, and the population groups, e.g. Indigenous participants and vulnerable groups (ed. Walter 2010, p. 105-6).

    Key principles of ethics ensure successful and minimal risk research and include the research doing no harm; participants being informed, consenting voluntarily without coercion and receiving an information sheet and consent form; privacy, confidentially and anonymity being addressed and conflicts of interests considered (Patulny 2017).

    Challenges include; lack of planning resulting in harm, (e.g. the Stanford Prison Experiment 1971); ensuring that there is some value in the research, resulting in a meaningful outcome (e.g. results from domestic violence research which may cause participants some distress should be used to inform policy); identifying and communicating appropriately with vulnerable population groups (e.g. ensuring intellectually disabled adults understand the research) and diverse cultural groups (e.g. cross-cultural miscommunication); ensuring values of funding organisations do not impact results (e.g. research conducted by the “no” vote may state that it is damaging for children to have anything other than a man and a woman as parents).
    #S234UOW17 #Lab1 #Shoal

    Walter, M (ed.) 2010, Social Research Methods, 2nd edn, Oxford University Press, South Melbourne.

    Patulny, R 2017, “Research Ethics” PowerPoint slides, SOC234, University of Wollongong, viewed 14 October 2017.

  2. Before funding, the Human Research Ethics Committee must approve of any research involving human participants. This is to ensure that every step of the research process is guided by ethical standards and principles put in place to protect the participant’s rights (Habibis 2013). The key principles in which researchers must follow are outlined by the Nuremburg Code and the National Statement on Ethical Conduct in Research Involving Humans.

    The Nuremberg Code states that participants should never experience any physical or psychological harm, should avoid risks involving disability or death, and are able to withdraw from the experiment any time the participant wishes. It is also essential that before participants become involved in any social research, the researcher must outline the purpose of the study, method, and any potential risks and benefits the study may present. The researchers should not use any deceptive practices and must have the participants voluntary consent (written or oral). The National Statement on Ethical Conduct in Research involving Humans propose four key values: merit and integrity, justice, beneficence, and respect for human beings. This further gives anonymity and confidentiality to all participants (Habibis 2013).

    However, ethical research also presents challenges involving conflicts of interest between the researcher and the participants, as well as vulnerable groups (e.g. children and mentally ill patients). For example, getting an informed consent from a mentally ill patient may be challenging, as they may not understand what they are being ask to participate in due to the medication they take (Habibis 2013).

    #S234UOW17 #Lab11 #Shoal

    Habibis, D 2013, ‘Ethics and Social Research’, in M Walter (ed.), Social Research Methods, 3rd edn, Oxford University Press, South Melbourne, pp. 72-98.

  3. The Ethics committee is a committee set up in order to look over the plans for people and groups research, and make sure their research plan follows ethical procedures. once the committee has passed a persons research plan they are given funds to begin their study.

    Ethical principles include: Nuremberg code, which is largely concerned with making sure Research is humane and doesn’t harm the participants in any way. Harm can include, mental harm, as well as emotional and physical harm. Some examples of Nuremberg guidelines include:

    1. Voluntary Consent – a person should not be coerced in any way into participating in a study. this can be done online, through the post, face to face or over the phone.
    2. Avoiding all unnecessary injury.

    Challenges of Ethical research include:

    Results good for society – this means you cant do research for your self of personal gain, the research proposed must be beneficial for Society as a whole.

    The Research and Researched have completely different needs and requirements (Habibis 2010):

    The researcher wants a large amounts of partiucipants, but the researched have the right to refuse to participate

    the research wants to use all his findings, but the researched want to remain anonymous

    Consenting: What the Participant is agreeing too must be 100% known to them, and they must agree to it.

  4. The Ethics committee is a committee set up in order to look over the plans for people and groups research, and make sure their research plan follows ethical procedures. once the committee has passed a persons research plan they are given funds to begin their study.

    Ethical principles include: Nuremberg code, which is largely concerned with making sure Research is humane and doesn’t harm the participants in any way. Harm can include, mental harm, as well as emotional and physical harm. Some examples of Nuremberg guidelines include:

    1. Voluntary Consent – a person should not be coerced in any way into participating in a study. this can be done online, through the post, face to face or over the phone.
    2. Avoiding all unnecessary injury.

    Challenges of Ethical research include:

    Results good for society – this means you cant do research for your self of personal gain, the research proposed must be beneficial for Society as a whole.

    The Research and Researched have completely different needs and requirements (Habibis 2010):

    The researcher wants a large amounts of partiucipants, but the researched have the right to refuse to participate

    the research wants to use all his findings, but the researched want to remain anonymous

    Consenting: What the Participant is agreeing too must be 100% known to them, and they must agree to it.

    Lack of planning your research can potentially lead to harm, a good example of this is the Stanford Prison Experiment.

    #S234UOW17 #Lab11 #Shoal

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