SOC234 2018 Lab11 – Mossvale

Dear SOC234 Lab,

Please respond to the following question with a reply-post of no more than 250 words:

‘What are the key principles and challenges of ethical research?”

Remember that you will need to post your reply before Lab 11, and don’t forget to look at both the instructions for Tweeting and Blogging and the Lab and Lecture Guide, both up on Moodle.

Thanks and good luck, Roger.

#S234UOW18  #Lab11  #Mvale

Posted in SOC234 - Social Research methods, UOW.

7 Comments on SOC234 2018 Lab11 – Mossvale

Skye Cannon said : Guest Report 4 weeks ago

The key principles of ethical research are to ensure you have Informed Participant consent, to question whether the results are worth any potential risks in providing good to society, Mitigate all Unnecessary Physical or mental suffering, correctly identifying groups at potential risk, that participant should be able to withdraw from the experiment at any time if they feel they can’t go on and likewise the researcher must be prepared to end the experiment if needed. The Challenges of ethical research insuring research principle are adhered to and that’s why we have ethics committees. Types of risk include breaches of privacy, Anonymity or confidentiality. Researchers will often use identification numbers to protect anonymity of participants. The risk of research without ethics approval is that not only could you put yourself and others at risk but you would have difficulty establishing any Research credibility and your work is unlikely to be published. The article in the conversation on Facebook‘s manipulation study highlights the issue of consent around how data will be use, not just that it’s been collected and both are important elements to full disclosure.

Skye Cannon said : Guest Report 4 weeks ago

The key principles of ethical research are to ensure you have Informed Participant consent, to question whether the results are worth any potential risks in providing good to society, Mitigate all Unnecessary Physical or mental suffering, correctly identifying groups at potential risk, that participant should be able to withdraw from the experiment at any time if they feel they can’t go on and likewise the researcher must be prepared to end the experiment if needed. The Challenges of ethical research insuring research principle are adhered to and that’s why we have ethics committees. Types of risk include breaches of privacy, Anonymity or confidentiality. Researchers will often use identification numbers to protect anonymity of participants. The risk of research without ethics approval is that not only could you put yourself and others at risk but you would have difficulty establishing any Research credibility and your work is unlikely to be published. The article in the conversation on Facebook‘s manipulation study highlights the issue of consent around how data will be use, not just that it’s been collected and both are important elements to full disclosure.

Bronwyn Sims said : Guest Report 4 weeks ago

Skye you have identified some really important ethical concerns that must be taken into consideration prior to, during and after any research.

Skye Cannon said : Guest Report 4 weeks ago

Ethical research principles are a set of standard to ensure issues are raised and addressed to mitigate risk and ensure safe responsible resection practices. Research requires Informed Participant consent, we need to question whether the results are worth any potential risks and are providing good to society, care to reduce or remove all Unnecessary Physical or mental suffering, correctly identifying groups at potential risk, participant should be able to withdraw from the experiment at any time if they feel they can’t go on and likewise the researcher must be prepared to end the experiment if needed. The Challenges of ethical research are insuring research principle are adhered to and Hence we have ethics committees To monitor and review. Types of risk include breaches of privacy, Anonymity or confidentiality. Researchers will often use identification numbers to protect anonymity when conducting qualitative data collection. The risk of research without ethics approval is that not only could you put yourself and others at risk but you would have difficulty establishing any Research credibility and your work is unlikely to be published. The article in the conversation on Facebook‘s manipulation study highlights the issue of consent around how data will be use, not just that it’s been collected and both are important elements to full disclosure.

Bronwyn Sims said : Guest Report 4 weeks ago

Laszlo and Jess You have both presented excellent blogs regarding the ethical requirements of social research.

Jessica Walshe said : Guest Report a month ago

Research ethics are applied to all areas of research, from the planning stage to conducting and writing up the research and even in any follow up research. The aim of research ethics are to protect the participant and to protect the research project. Ethical research is governed by ethical principles and values and is conducted with the best interests of the participants in mind, as opposed to the other aspects of research which revolve around the project itself (Habibis, 2013, p. 73). There is a power imbalance between the researcher and the participant which must be acknowledged, this is especially true when the research area involves those from vulnerable groups in society. According to Habibis (2013, p. 73) the researcher is the one who is control of all aspects of the project, which only highlights the power imbalance further and informs us of the need to protect the participant from harm. Informed consent is sought in order to verify that participation in the research is voluntary and that the participant is informed of the purpose of the research, the methods used to conduct the research and any risks associated with their participation in the project (Habibis (2013, pp. 75-79). Researchers are ethically obligated to ensure the participants anonymity and confidentiality. Anonymity ensures that the participant cannot be identified as having taken part in the research and confidentiality guarantees that they cannot be identified from the data they provide in the research project (Habibis (2013, p. 82). Punch (2014) adds that one way researchers ensure confidentiality is by removing identifiable information from the data they store, a process which is known as ‘anonymisation’. References Habibis, D 2013, ‘Ethics and Social Research’, Chapter 4 in Walter, Maggie (ed.). 2013, ‘Social Research Methods’3rd ed. South Melbourne: Oxford University Press, pp. 72-79. Punch, KF 2014, ‘Introduction to Social Research Quantitative and Qualitative Approaches’, 3rd ed, SAGE Publications, London.

Laszlo La Marque said : Guest Report a month ago

The key principles of ethical research, especially in human research, address the challenges of mediating the conflict of interest that occurs between what researchers need to conduct experiments and what participants need in terms of protections. Adapting those moral standards which moderate behaviour, ethical research aims to produce material of beneficial use to society in order to justify human research. It is therefore governed by Human Research Ethics Committees. The first precaution of ethical research is, like medical ethics, to do no harm. This involves considering the type of research and its methods and identifying potential risks. Being aware of risks to potentially vulnerable participants, particularly by being conscious of embarrassing or distressing issues and sensitive topics is also vital, and good practitioners provide avenues for professional support and debriefing after the research is concluded. Risks must be communicated to participants when gaining consent and risk should be avoided if possible. The option to end the research or experiment at any time by either researcher or participant is essential as is ensuring the anonymity of participants and the confidentiality of their data. Consent with voluntary participation is key. Informed consent means participants are aware of the reason for the research, any risks associated with it, and that they agree to undertake it without coercion, often confirmed by signing registered forms. Tacit consent is often assumed based on circumstances and verbal consent. Sometimes, particularly in covert ethnographic research, consent cannot be obtained but this is moderated by ensuring the anonymity of participants and the unlikelihood of their harm. Privacy must be assured through anonymity to protect participants’ identification as participants and confidentiality ensures that the specific contributions of respondents cannot be identified; these are safeguarded by secure storage and destruction of data as well as restricting access and use of data to appropriate persons.

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