SOC344 2018 Tut11 – Mon 16.30pm

For this week, you need to watch the video/photo montage compilation and post a comment or tweet. Let’s see what you’ve learned, and what you think others have learned and expressed, about how emotions and bodies are experienced, constructed, and managed in society.

#S344UOW18 #Tut11 #Mon1630

Posted in SOC327 - Emotions Bodies and Society, UOW.

14 Comments on SOC344 2018 Tut11 – Mon 16.30pm

Kareem Choubassi said : Guest Report just now

The videos for topic 2 of the mind and body split covers the key themes in the different approaches discussed by Barbalet, particularly emphasizing the ideas of these the emotion complementing rationality as well as an interconnected dynamic between bodily emotional responses prior to logical thought ranging between the critical and radical approach. The voice clip discussing how a person went with “their gut” in a situation shows how an emotion-based response can be involved and result in a seemingly rational decision. The compilation of civilised bodies/complex emotion displayed the key theme of the complexity of emotions in contemporary society when faced with certain situations that involve stress and goal-setting as social catalysts however it seemed a little rushed in it’s attempt to show distinctive boundaries between complexity and simple emotional states. Furthermore, the civilising process as described by Elias is apparent in certain clips where individuals are shown to be disgusted or shocked when these social norms are defied or broken. A prominent theme within the love and intimacy compilation was how in late modernity, plastic sexuality as put forward by Giddens exists within gay relationships and online dating and it’s acceptance within 21st century society. The video for body modification and status competition touched upon the themes of envy and admiration, however I felt it could have delved into the instigation of those emotions further within contemporary younger women but discussed well the social norms surrounding bodies and how people tend to compare themselves to others physically. The interview with the American women was useful in showing mainstream interpretations of manners and etiquette (i.e. boasting) in US society. The seduction of being deviant and the sneaky thrills brought with it are shown rather effectively in the video compilation regarding it, furthermore the visible and invisible stigmas and the normalised micro-aggressions inherent to these stigmas surrounding race and LGBTQI communities are apparent in the recounted stories by video participants. The topic 9 compilation showed in a rather realistic and satirical way how medicalisation tends to be the go-to solution for mental health problems which can often tend to be rooted in harmful social norms and lack of real social bonds in late modernity. The video on happiness and reflexivity displayed how happiness is unique to each person and is derived from different forms, especially in the first clip where the method of positive psychology is evident where people are appreciative of their relationships and current social bonds. Furthermore, an interview displayed how happiness can be affected by social comparison and how gender is inherent to the level of happiness many have. #S344UOW18 #Tut11 #Mon1630

Stella Crick said : Guest Report 10 hrs ago

Some believe that emotions are our initial and most animalistic response, as actions are based on emotional responses at our raw and authentic state. This opinion continues with the belief of the mind and body split. However, some argue our actions are not a consequence of our truest self, but socially inscribed by complex emotions. It is conveyed that society instils norms in which we must abide by, in order to prevent public shame and isolation. Continuing with themes of societal induced shame, are circumstances which modern people seek intimacy and love. Through enhanced technology, people can use dating apps to find transformed love from the comfort of their home. It would be interesting to examine why society cannot judge someone for being in their pyjamas at home, yet wearing that attire in public when searching for love is unacceptable? Transformations have also occurred with the human body, physical appearance has become an obsession with the rise of social media. Posting photos of the body online can be used to increase social status in late modernity, competition appears through hashtags such as #fitspo and #girlcrush. It would be stimulating to contemplate further the notion that older generations weren’t so obsessed with how they looked because they did not have social media and a constant bombardment of photos at their fingertips. Coloured races of people are commonly stigmatised by society and experience microagressions because of the way they look. Often made to feel as “outsiders” or “deviants”, these people can develop loneliness and be convinced by medical “experts” that medicalisation is the key to their happiness. Aside from race, gender is another determinant for wellbeing. Therefore it can be interpreted that society alters perceptions of wellbeing, as happiness is subjective and comparative. Ultimately, emotions and bodies are socially constructed and managed. #S344UOW18 #Tut11 #Mon1630

Samantha Waters said : Guest Report 10 hrs ago

In the mind/body split the videos explained how our emotions can cloud our judgement and decision making, however it does not control our actions completely, our actions can be both influenced and not influenced by our emotions. It is worth noting that in most circumstances emotions are used as a tool for reasons/rationality. Civilised Bodies - Complex Emotions emphasised that emotions can be determined as social or individual emotion as well as a simple or complex emotion. The videos also highlighted people’s reactions to another persons actions in different social emotive contexts; basically this highlights that our individual emotions can be influenced by the social world around us. Love and Intimacy explored how different relationships have formed, perceived normalities in the contexts of a relationship and the exploration of concepts of gender equality and intimacy; in that older generations had different social constructs than recent generations and that intimacy isn’t necessarily romantic in nature. Consumption, Status and Body Modification is a topic that is focused on attitudes, opinions and beliefs surrounding these topics. We leant that there are many valid differing views on body modification. Deviant and Disembodies: Fearful Thrills was covered in week 7 and we were taught about the reason why people do bad things. Whether it would be they have the freedom to do so, they have the adrenaline rush of getting caught or whatever else. The general idea was that people are creatures of habit and often don’t see the consequences. Modern Angst, Loneliness and Medicalisation where we explored the differences and similarities between the genders and generations on perceptions and prevalence on mental health challenges. It is more common for women then for men to disclose and seek help for dealing with a mental illness. Yet a common and some what ill effective treatment method is the bombardment of medications for the sometimes many issues someone might face. Happiness and Reflexivity touched on the concepts of happiness from different generations and how that impacts a person’s wellbeing in that, people who have higher self rating of happiness tend to have high ratings of self wellbeing. We learnt that most people find happiness through external motivators i.e. friends and family. #S344UOW18 #Tut11 #Mon1630

Amit Anand said : Guest Report 10 hrs ago

The video for topic 2, the mind- body spilt had common themes on emotions and rationality which I found were interesting. This video also addresses the relationship between bodies and emotions in modern times and in a personalised way. I found it very interesting that how different videos touch upon different aspects of emotions and complex emotions specially in third video clip ‘civilised body, complex emotions’ topic which shows in reality how different people understand what emotions and complex emotions are in real life. Also the fourth video ‘Love and Intimacy ‘ shows how the use of technology has redefined love in the post-modern era with the use of online dating. The video on stigma shows how stigma relates to different genders and how its visible, non-visible .The medicalisation topic video discussed the mental health issues and acceptable treatment with its importance in today’s society. The video on Modern Angst and loneliness topic showed the effects of depression and anxiety globally. The data showed was an eye opener to demonstrate the effects on millions of people worldwide .The last video on happiness and reflexivity shows the relationship between complex emotions and different social backgrounds. Overall the videos and clips explored mostly all themes as covered in the lectures and I think there could be more added on emotional reflexivity in the last happiness clip. #S344UOW18#TUT 11# Mon 1630

Brittany Gratzer said : Guest Report 10 hrs ago

Topic 6 was discussing status competition and body modification. This was well explored in the groups as many interviews asked if the body was a reflection of the soul. One interviewee responded that they knew many attractive people who were mean, and they believed that if you are a good person that it will shine through your mannerisms and general behaviours. This comment is what I believe aswell that people can look beautiful on the outside and others will see that and think they are beautiful on the inside, however I believe even if society is obsessed with how we look we still look towards others behaviours and make more substantial judgements of those. What was most common in the groups work was that tattoos and peircings were normal and even plastic surgery was to an extent but as soon as the surgery became "noticeable" many thought it was disgusting or unnecessary, even though many of them had modifications done to them. Topic 10 explored happiness and reflexivity. Many groups wanted to see what made people happy and why, a lot of these answers were family and health. Where i like to think that m heal doesn't make me happy it just allows me to do the things that do make me happy. One group asked about the difference in happiness levels between men and women and the higher suicide rate in men. The interviewee responded that due to societal stigmas men don't express their emotions as openly as women. I think a lot was talked about happiness by itself and not how it can be intertwined with other emotions, for example playing soccer makes me happy but I feel a range of emotions while playing it and just because I can get frustrated doesn't mean I'm any less happy that I'm playing. However I did like how the groups looked into happiness through different generations aswell as gender. It provided more insight into happiness through the ages.

Michaela Matthews said : Guest Report 15 hrs ago

Topic 2 shows the difference between emotions and reason showing that emotion can influence rational thought. Effectively used a mock interview to demonstrate the difference between, conventional, critical and radical approach. Topic 3 was effective in showing how we have civilised bodies and have to manage our emotions and actions in public so suit social expectations/rules. The interviews in the second video established that there was a difference between complex and simple emotions, but the differences could have been made clearer. Topic 4 does a good job at explaining what intimacy means. They showed different types of relationships in modernity and demonstrated that relationships strive more on equality. Compares sex and love in older generations, sex never used to be expressed and talked about very openly, but in modern times it is. Pop culture became very focused on sex which could of influenced this social change. Topic 5 explains the difference between envy and admiration. People often feel ashamed of their bodies and strive for changes through body modification. There's a status competition, society dictates how we are meant to look. Suggests that there’s a generational change in status competition, older generation were more competitive in relation to the workplace. I think this could have been expanded further and looked at a generational change in body status. Topic 7 shows examples of stealing as a sneaky thrill, and declares deviance as a crime. I think more depth could have been conducted here by asking people what drives them to commit these acts. Provides thorough examples of stigma surrounding racism and stereotypes relating to LGBTQ communities. Topic 9 looks at how medicalisation has become a common and accepted treatment for mental issues, but isn’t always necessary. Looks at the normality of the lack of social interaction in the city, demonstrating that the workplace has created loose relationships. Topic 10, considerably looks at what happiness means to different people of different ages and why. The third video was a well constructed piece showing generic things that make people happy, but I think this could of had more depth. Social interaction was discussed as being inherent to well being. Demonstrates that social media influences what happiness is, but this is superficial and not accurate. Perhaps there could have been some inclusion of how un/happiness has been ‘treated’ and ‘resolved’ and how we measure happiness across nations. #SOC344 #tut11 #mon1630

Sophie Washington said : Guest Report 17 hrs ago

‘Deviant and Disembodied, fearful thrills’ is a topic with two very distinct and contrasting sides. As Patulny (2018) outlines, there are those who actively pursue behaviour perceived as deviant for the excitement of acting outside of their normal behaviour (Katz, 1988). And on the other hand, there are those who are labelled deviant based on aspects of their identity stigmatised as deviant. These being visible, such as race and invisible such as sexuality (Patulny, 2018). This distinction is demonstrated within the video compilation, with the two illustrated side by side emphasising the contrast between the associated set of emotions. While with the desire to be deviant, there is this thrill of excitement, as Katz (1988) alludes to; the thrill of playing someone other than oneself. In stark contrast are the ‘deviants’ who too ‘play’ someone other than themselves, as they are forced to hide aspects of their identity to assimilate to the societal norms. Further to these two sides, is the societal conditioning that has caused this stigmatising of people. As the essential readings illustrate, the term deviancy is subjective; being of a different race doesn’t make you deviant, it’s when you are of a specific race living within certain country that labels it deviancy. Something that was well conveyed within the compilation is this social conditioning that has normalised the stigmatisation of certain groups and subsequently led to the alienation and disembodiment of these individuals, to the point where someone will ask almost immediately where you are from if you appear of different ethnicity, as though you do not belong here. Katz, J 1988, ‘The Seductions of Crime: Moral and Sensual Attractions of Doing Evil,’ New York: Basil Blackwell, Chapter 2. Patulny, R 2018, ‘Deviant and Disembodied, fearful thrills’ PowerPoint Slides, SOC344, University of Wollongong, viewed 20 May 2018.

Bryant Mitchell said : Guest Report yesterday

Topic two’s video on Mind Body Split did a very good job of showing why both emotion and rationality are important when it comes to decision making. The video did a great job on showing the pros and cons of making decisions solely based on either emotion or rationality. Topic 3’s video on Civilized Bodies, Complex Emotions really went into debt on what the difference between individual and social emotions are. As well as very clearly defining what the difference between a simple and complex emotion is. The one thing I did notice is that some of the people that were interviewed seemed like they did not fully understand the questions they were asked. Topic 4’s video on Love and Intimacy in Late Modernity did a good job of showing different aspects of love and the pros and cons that they have. The video did an exceptional job on showing how jealousy plays a role in relationships, whether it be good or bad. Topic 6’s video on Status Competition and Body Modification, in my opinion, was the most well-done video because it was so clearly explained. The video did a great job of showing beauty standards and cosmetic modifications through images of celebrities, plastic surgeries, and more things that help break down this topic. Topic 7’s topic on Deviance, Stigma and Sneaky Thrills did an excellent job of showing how people are discriminated against in all kinds of ways based on their race, ethnicity, background, and sexual orientation. However, I do think that religion should have been acknowledged more because it plays such a big role in regards to this topic. Topic 9’s video on Modern Angst Loneliness and Medicalisation used statistics and data based on previous studies to show how depression and anxiety has effected millions of people worldwide. In my opinion, this video did the best job of using statistics to prove their point. Lastly Topic 10’s video on Happiness and Reflexivity showed how different types of people, of all ages, view themselves as happy in different ways. They go into detail by asking everyone what makes them happy and how they think the typical person should live in order to fulfill a happy life.

Jessica Baguley said : Guest Report yesterday

Dale Carnegie the author of ‘How to Win Friends and Influence People’ is famously quoted as saying, ‘when you are dealing with people you are not dealing with creatures of logic, but creatures of emotion’. This quotation, I think encompasses the common thread that ties each of these films together, that being that no we are emotional creatures and emotions have a hand in shaping nearly every aspect of our daily lives. The first two weeks of films were tasked with presenting the more strictly theoretical aspects of the subject. Using quantitative research techniques week two’s films explored the mind/body distinction and conveyed ideas that were very much in line with more modern interpretations of the role of emotion in everyday life. Week threes film extended upon these ideas by identifying the ways in which emotions have been used not only to convey the way we feel but also to control the ways we behave. The following 9 weeks took the more theoretical aspects of the subject and situated them within everyday contexts such as modern loneliness and angst, love and intimacy, deviance body modification, work-life well-being. The films in these weeks did well to explore how the various social forces that individuals interact with can not only alter our own emotions but the ways in which our emotions can alter them. In particular, I found it fascinating the ways in which the films on love and intimacy, as well as angst and loneliness engaged with the ways in which modern forces like social media had produced rather unprecedented effects on the overall happiness and fulfilment individuals, believed they could attain. Although I do wish that each of films engaged with late modernity in ways that speculated on future trends I think that they all benefited from their engagement with sociological and reflexive perspectives. Overall each of the films was well thought out and explored the central themes, motifs and theories this subject presented in ways that enhanced the learning of each student.

Jessica Baguley said : Guest Report yesterday

Dale Carnegie the author of ‘How to Win Friends and Influence People’ is famously quoted as saying, ‘when you are dealing with people you are not dealing with creatures of logic, but creatures of emotion’. This quotation, I think encompasses the common thread that ties each of these films together, that being that no we are emotional creatures and emotions have a hand in shaping nearly every aspect of our daily lives. The first two weeks of films were tasked with presenting the more strictly theoretical aspects of the subject. Using quantitative research techniques week two’s films explored the mind/body distinction and conveyed ideas that were very much in line with more modern interpretations of the role of emotion in everyday life. Week threes film extended upon these ideas by identifying the ways in which emotions have been used not only to convey the way we feel but also to control the ways we behave. The following 9 weeks took the more theoretical aspects of the subject and situated them within everyday contexts such as modern loneliness and angst, love and intimacy, deviance body modification, work-life well-being. The films in these weeks did well to explore how the various social forces that individuals interact with can not only alter our own emotions but the ways in which our emotions can alter them. In particular, I found it fascinating the ways in which the films on love and intimacy, as well as angst and loneliness engaged with the ways in which modern forces like social media had produced rather unprecedented effects on the overall happiness and fulfilment individuals, believed they could attain. Although I do wish that each of films engaged with late modernity in ways that speculated on future trends I think that they all benefited from their engagement with sociological and reflexive perspectives. Overall each of the films was well thought out and explored the central themes, motifs and theories this subject presented in ways that enhanced the learning of each student.

B.Pike said : Guest Report 2 days ago

Despite rapid social changes throughout modernity, we hold the traditional idea that emotions are impulsive, overwhelming (to our detriment) and must be guided by reason. Though relying on reason alone is equally negative, as emotions help us determine what is valuable. Regulation of the body also continued. Outward displays of bodily functions, like chewing with an open mouth are met with displays of disgust. How we learn to associate acts with disgust was not addressed. Emotions are seen as both complex and simple. Complex emotions were influenced by multiple social factors at once, creating an emotional state made up of many different simple emotions. Feelings towards sex, marriage, the importance of equality and freedom within relationships changed drastically. Digital communication infiltrated the dating world, but did not replace the necessity of physical interaction. Marriage is still an important sign of commitment, but is not as necessary. The rise in women's sexuality was mentioned, but men still saw themselves as wanting sex more, associated with a drive once channeled through their role as breadwinner. Media portrayals of sexuality and relationships were seen as misleading, but no one mentioned the effects these had on dating and relationships. Media impacted our acceptance of body modification as a form of individual expression, but tied to a normative beauty standard. Envy happens when we compare ourselves to those who conform in ways we don't, but is considered irrational. Non-normative bodies, like fat bodies, are linked to shame, embarrassment and deviance. Deviant bodies face visible stigma, more via microaggressions than overt aggression; linked to more flexible class mobility causing less acceptance towards the practice of boasting. Invisible stigma involves hiding the parts of the self that are considered deviant, involving emotion work and fear of being discovered. There is a difference between this deviance and criminal deviance, though other than peer pressure, there was no answer to why people would choose to be deviant. Pressures to conform to modern standards of success are having an impact on mental health, with rising feelings of loneliness, depression and anxiety. These problems are increasingly internalized, not helped by the rising acceptance of medicalization in an individualistic society. We are told to always be striving for perfection and happiness. Social factors have relevance in the formation of a happy life, but the need for emotional reflexivity, so both social and individual are considered when assessing happiness, was not discussed. #S344UOW18 #Tut11 #Mon1630

B.Pike said : Guest Report 2 days ago

Despite rapid social changes throughout modernity, we hold the traditional idea that emotions are impulsive, overwhelming (to our detriment) and must be guided by reason. Though relying on reason alone is equally negative, as emotions help us determine what is valuable. Regulation of the body also continued. Outward displays of bodily functions, like chewing with an open mouth are met with displays of disgust. How we learn to associate acts with disgust was not addressed. Emotions are seen as both complex and simple. Complex emotions were influenced by multiple social factors at once, creating an emotional state made up of many different simple emotions. Feelings towards sex, marriage, the importance of equality and freedom within relationships changed drastically. Digital communication infiltrated the dating world, but did not replace the necessity of physical interaction. Marriage is still an important sign of commitment, but is not as necessary. The rise in women's sexuality was mentioned, but men still saw themselves as wanting sex more, associated with a drive once channeled through their role as breadwinner. Media portrayals of sexuality and relationships were seen as misleading, but no one mentioned the effects these had on dating and relationships. Media impacted our acceptance of body modification as a form of individual expression, but tied to a normative beauty standard. Envy happens when we compare ourselves to those who conform in ways we don't, but is considered irrational. Non-normative bodies, like fat bodies, are linked to shame, embarrassment and deviance. Deviant bodies face visible stigma, more via microaggressions than overt aggression; linked to more flexible class mobility causing less acceptance towards the practice of boasting. Invisible stigma involves hiding the parts of the self that are considered deviant, involving emotion work and fear of being discovered. There is a difference between this deviance and criminal deviance, though other than peer pressure, there was no answer to why people would choose to be deviant. Pressures to conform to modern standards of success are having an impact on mental health, with rising feelings of loneliness, depression and anxiety. These problems are increasingly internalized, not helped by the rising acceptance of medicalization in an individualistic society. We are told to always be striving for perfection and happiness. Social factors have relevance in the formation of a happy life, but the need for emotional reflexivity, so both social and individual are considered when assessing happiness, was not discussed. #S344UOW18 #Tut11 #Mon1630

Katy Halverson said : Guest Report 3 days ago

The videos for topic 2, the mind-body split, all seemed to argue a common theme that emotions and rationality are interrelated, and that neither is superior to the other. They emphasized the uncontrollability and variability of our emotions and how people might respond differently to a situation. One video addressed the relation between bodies and emotions by discussing how different people responded to an injury or ailment. A clip from the week discussing civilized bodies and complex emotions showed examples of corrective behaviors taken when social norms (like talking quietly in the library) were broken. This video clearly illustrated the process of civilizing behavior through shame. Another video showed an interview where participants were asked how they were feeling, and whether this was a complex or simple emotion. While this clip did a good job of distinguishing between the two, it did not do as good of a job at defining simple versus complex emotions. It also didn’t address how we assign meanings to certain emotions, or how complexity may vary across cultures. In the love and intimacy videos, one interview addressed modernity by interviewing people of older and younger generations to assess their different views on intimacy. The biggest difference came from participants describing how they met their significant other—younger people met and communicated primarily through social media, whereas older people had met and talked in person. Two videos also addressed modern intimacy by telling stories of internet dating and LGBT relationships. In the modern age, online dating and non-heterosexual relationships have become more mainstream than in the past. Topic 6, status and body modification, had videos that addressed the difference between envy and admiration and the body being a reflection of the soul. One video addressed the influence of the media on body image by scrolling through an Instagram feed, showing the number of images focused on beauty. It also addressed the stigma around body modification, explaining that some forms of expression (like tattoos) are more socially accepted than cosmetic surgery or extreme body modification. The videos from topic 9 illustrate the medicalization of many modern countries by showing a doctor throwing pills at a patient who complained about psychological issues. One clip addressed the growth of anxiety and depression in Australia, and another explained this was due in part to loss of loyalty in the work sphere due to fewer relationships and less interaction in the modern age.

Katy Halverson said : Guest Report 3 days ago

The videos for topic 2, the mind-body split, all seemed to argue a common theme that emotions and rationality are interrelated, and that neither is superior to the other. They emphasized the uncontrollability and variability of our emotions and how people might respond differently to a situation. One video addressed the relation between bodies and emotions by discussing how different people responded to an injury or ailment. A clip from the week discussing civilized bodies and complex emotions showed examples of corrective behaviors taken when social norms (like talking quietly in the library) were broken. This video clearly illustrated the process of civilizing behavior through shame. Another video showed an interview where participants were asked how they were feeling, and whether this was a complex or simple emotion. While this clip did a good job of distinguishing between the two, it did not do as good of a job at defining simple versus complex emotions. It also didn’t address how we assign meanings to certain emotions, or how complexity may vary across cultures. In the love and intimacy videos, one interview addressed modernity by interviewing people of older and younger generations to assess their different views on intimacy. The biggest difference came from participants describing how they met their significant other—younger people met and communicated primarily through social media, whereas older people had met and talked in person. Two videos also addressed modern intimacy by telling stories of internet dating and LGBT relationships. In the modern age, online dating and non-heterosexual relationships have become more mainstream than in the past. Topic 6, status and body modification, had videos that addressed the difference between envy and admiration and the body being a reflection of the soul. One video addressed the influence of the media on body image by scrolling through an Instagram feed, showing the number of images focused on beauty. It also addressed the stigma around body modification, explaining that some forms of expression (like tattoos) are more socially accepted than cosmetic surgery or extreme body modification. The videos from topic 9 illustrate the medicalization of many modern countries by showing a doctor throwing pills at a patient who complained about psychological issues. One clip addressed the growth of anxiety and depression in Australia, and another explained this was due in part to loss of loyalty in the work sphere due to fewer relationships and less interaction in the modern age.

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