SOC344 2018 Tut5 – Shoalhaven

We all know what its like to feel the wrong thing at the wrong time. Boredom when you’re meant to be interested (or at least look interested) in that lecture, anxiety when you’re meant to be happy with friends, tiredness when you’re playing with children, and frustration and stress at work. We all know what it means to feel the wrong thing, and then have to pretend – or display – a different feeling, or even somehow make ourselves feel something altogether different. We call this ‘emotion management.’

But how do we manage our emotions? When should we manage them? Should we always try to think happy thoughts – is sadness just bad and troublesome? Or are there social rules about how and when we should do this? Arlie Hochschild suggests that society has ‘feeling rules’ about how we are allowed to feel in given situations – particularly at work – and that these rules impact differently on men and women, with women still doing the bulk of the ‘emotional labour’ involved in care jobs in most countries.

Do you manage your emotions most of the time at work? Or in other areas of life? Does your gender affect this?

#S344UOW18 #Tut5 #Shoal

Posted in SOC327 - Emotions Bodies and Society, UOW.

4 Comments on SOC344 2018 Tut5 – Shoalhaven

Leanne Watson said : Guest Report 8 months ago

At work it is an old adage that “The customer is always right”. There is little financial profit in pointing out to a customer that they are wrong, even when it’s clear that they are being unreasonable. However, if you manage your emotions, and use your friendliness and consideration in a certain manner, you can have the customer ‘eating out of your hand’. That is why good salespeople are valued in a company. Often parents have to manage their emotions when their children have made mistakes. Think of the classic nappy eruption that babies seem to have, just as (usually mum) is about to step out the door. What point would there be, showing a baby your frustration? There can only be negative consequences if you do. The latter might be a good time to apply the ‘feeling rules’ that Arlie Russell Hochschild (1979) refers to. #S344UOW18 #Tut5 #Shoal

Leanne Watson said : Guest Report 8 months ago

At work it is an old adage that “The customer is always right”. There is little financial profit in pointing out to a customer that they are wrong, even when it’s clear that they are being unreasonable. However, if you manage your emotions, and use your friendliness and consideration in a certain manner, you can have the customer ‘eating out of your hand’. That is why good salespeople are valued in a company. Often parents have to manage their emotions when their children have made mistakes. Think of the classic nappy eruption that babies seem to have, just as (usually mum) is about to step out the door. What point would there be, showing a baby your frustration? There can only be negative consequences if you do. The latter might be a good time to apply the ‘feeling rules’ that Arlie Russell Hochschild (1979) refers to. #S344UOW18 #Shoal #Tut5

Amy Angeloska said : Guest Report 8 months ago

Do you manage your emotions most of the time at work? Or in other areas of life? Does your gender affect this? Due to being a supervisor at my job sometimes I have to manage my emotions, if something in my personal life is bothering me I have to put it aside and not let it affect the way I am in the workplace and with my own staff. It is important to manage those emotions, as you do not want to create a negative workplace or inflict your personal life onto who ever it is that you work with. One of my bosses is my Dad so when at work it is important that we separate personal life and emotions away from work and we have never had a issue doing so. Managing your emotions can be difficult in any situation whether you are going to work or even just going out with friends, as usually you would not want your emotions to get the better of you, you would just want to have a good time and socialise in that area of life. I think sometimes gender can affect your emotions in regards to relationships I think males in my opinion struggle with showing emotions or lack in ‘emotional participation’ with their partners although females could lack in observing the emotions those males convey in a relationship. Overall it seems that gender can affect how you express your emotions. Your surface emotions can show in body language your deeper emotions can show in the way you express yourself verbally. #S344UOW18 #Tut5 #Shoal

Demi McLatchie said : Guest Report 8 months ago

It is an expectation of employers, that employees present their emotions appropriately in work places. As a result, and in order to keep a job, people no longer have the ability to portray their emotions and feelings at face value, and must abide by rules implemented by society, such as; ‘Feeling Rules’, developed by Hochschild (1979), which refers to the action of individuals conforming to feeling an acceptable emotion, depending on the social situation; and ‘Display Rules’ (Ekman, Sorenson, & Friesen 1969), which indicates what emotions individuals can exhibit during varying social settings. The consequence of these emotion expectations which have been placed upon individuals by society, result in individuals performing emotion management strategies such as, ‘Surface Acting’ and ‘Deep Acting’. As a woman working in a fast-paced optometrist, it is essential that the concept of ‘Surface Acting’ is utilised, in order to suppress any negative emotions that may arise from the constant demand of patients; ensuring that the integrity of the workplace is protected, rather than the emotional stability of the individual. #S344UOW18 #Shoal #Tut5

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