SOC344 2018 Tut8 – Mossvale

Why do people do ‘bad’ things? Is it because they feel bad – or because those bad things feel good? It’s not hard to find instances of terrible, scary things in popular media – youth gone wild, health epidemics, crime waves, etc. Sometimes these are beat-ups and moral panics; and sometimes they are more common than we think, or even unbelievably real. Nasty incidents of online trolling and attacks are commonplace, and mass gatherings channeling anger and even hatred occurred as recently as just over ten years ago Australia in the form of the Cronulla Riots.

But why do these things happen? What are the emotions that drive these acts? There can be a simple thrill or joy in doing the wrong thing – what Jack Katz calls the ‘seductions of crime’ – that tricks and compels some people into committing anti-social acts, but are these secretive, individualized compulsions not shaped by how we relate – or fail to relate authentically – to the people around us? Do we not deviate because we feel (and often hide) a sense of deviance, and maybe even shame? Is it shame and fear of the challenge to identities – to conventional masculine dominance, or the threat of job loss from globalization – that compels some young men to anger and violence, as Ghassan Hage has argued occurred on Cronulla Beach eleven years ago? How do all these feeling mix and feed off each other – fear, shame, repression, thrills, and anger – in the dynamics of deviance?

#S344UOW18 #Tut8 #Mvale

Posted in SOC327 - Emotions Bodies and Society, UOW.

5 Comments on SOC344 2018 Tut8 – Mossvale

Bronwyn Sims said : Guest Report 3 months ago

Some good points raised here. It interested me how Katz suggested that the 'sneaky thrills' were an exercise in realisation that one could present an outer persona whilst thinking/ feeling something else entirely. These seem to be conscious acts of blending rationality and emotions in a combination to practice surface acting - but not surface acting to please/appease the expectations of others but to actually do it for an individual sense of satisfaction and achievement.

Lorann McCann said : Guest Report 3 months ago

What if your authenticity was based on what others expected you to be and not who you really were? As society has changed its expectations and exceptions, what once was might have been considered deviant or even against the law is now acceptable in everyday society. Does this idea extend to joining a movement for example gay rights movements (when homosexual activity was inappropriate and could cause job/career loss) and would this ‘deviant’ activity be related to Jack Kats idea of committing a crime while projecting a ‘normal’ appearance. In addition to the gay rights movement I feel that committing a crime could be related to rejecting the ‘authentic’ personality that is expected of a person. Due to the lack of connection with the persona that’s expected the thrill of committing a crime releases the pressure of expectation and the ability to fool a shopkeeper because they expect goodness out of you.

zeljka o'malley said : Guest Report 3 months ago

Environmental influences such as peer pressure, poverty, neighbourhood and bad adult role models play a large part in deviant behaviour in adolescents. Unfortunately parents, the police and juvenile courts focus on the actions carried out by the child, rather than reasons behind the actions carried out by the child. Instead of blaming children and holding them completely responsible, we need to understand and look more closely at how their environment directs their emotions and actions. Taking a different approach to how deviant adolescents are dealt with, can help to decrease deviant behaviour in their adult years.

zeljka o'malley said : Guest Report 3 months ago

Environmental influences such as peer pressure, poverty, neighbourhood and bad adult role models play a large part in deviant behaviour in adolescents. Unfortunately parents, the police and juvenile courts focus on the actions carried out by the child, rather than reasons behind the actions carried out by the child. Instead of blaming children and holding them completely responsible, we need to understand and look more closely at how their environment directs their emotions and actions. Taking a different approach to how deviant adolescents are dealt with, can help to decrease deviant behaviour in their adult years.

Abbie Rowley said : Guest Report 4 months ago

Why do people do bad things? Some would say well we are only human we cant do good things all the time and i agree as much as we try to live our lives without bad things happening it is bound to happen especially when we get caught up in our emotions. I know myself that i can get very caught up in my emotions but i could never bear the thought of stealing or committing a crime so when reading Katz (1988) article I was shocked. When reading about how when this girl stole a necklace it gave her this kind of thrill that she would describe as being "almost orgasmic", i just can't see how you could feel that way about doing something like shoplifting. I feel these kinds of people who do bad things, that give them that rush of excitement are more then likely to keep doing bad things to give them that thrill,even if they have moments of shame or fear because at the end of the day who doesn't want to have those exciting emotions? There is just better ways to get those emotions without doing bad things.

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