SOC344 2018 Tut8 – Mon 14.30pm

Why do people do ‘bad’ things? Is it because they feel bad – or because those bad things feel good? It’s not hard to find instances of terrible, scary things in popular media – youth gone wild, health epidemics, crime waves, etc. Sometimes these are beat-ups and moral panics; and sometimes they are more common than we think, or even unbelievably real. Nasty incidents of online trolling and attacks are commonplace, and mass gatherings channeling anger and even hatred occurred as recently as just over ten years ago Australia in the form of the Cronulla Riots.

But why do these things happen? What are the emotions that drive these acts? There can be a simple thrill or joy in doing the wrong thing – what Jack Katz calls the ‘seductions of crime’ – that tricks and compels some people into committing anti-social acts, but are these secretive, individualized compulsions not shaped by how we relate – or fail to relate authentically – to the people around us? Do we not deviate because we feel (and often hide) a sense of deviance, and maybe even shame? Is it shame and fear of the challenge to identities – to conventional masculine dominance, or the threat of job loss from globalization – that compels some young men to anger and violence, as Ghassan Hage has argued occurred on Cronulla Beach eleven years ago? How do all these feeling mix and feed off each other – fear, shame, repression, thrills, and anger – in the dynamics of deviance?

#S344UOW18 #Tut8 #Mon1430

Posted in SOC327 - Emotions Bodies and Society, UOW.

13 Comments on SOC344 2018 Tut8 – Mon 14.30pm

Bryant Mitchell said : Guest Report 3 months ago

Topic two’s video on Mind Body Split did a very good job of showing why both emotion and rationality are important when it comes to decision making. The video did a great job on showing the pros and cons of making decisions solely based on either emotion or rationality. Topic 3’s video on Civilized Bodies, Complex Emotions really went into debt on what the difference between individual and social emotions are. As well as very clearly defining what the difference between a simple and complex emotion is. The one thing I did notice is that some of the people that were interviewed seemed like they did not fully understand the questions they were asked. Topic 4’s video on Love and Intimacy in Late Modernity did a good job of showing different aspects of love and the pros and cons that they have. The video did an exceptional job on showing how jealousy plays a role in relationships, whether it be good or bad. Topic 6’s video on Status Competition and Body Modification, in my opinion, was the most well-done video because it was so clearly explained. The video did a great job of showing beauty standards and cosmetic modifications through images of celebrities, plastic surgeries, and more things that help break down this topic. Topic 7’s topic on Deviance, Stigma and Sneaky Thrills did an excellent job of showing how people are discriminated against in all kinds of ways based on their race, ethnicity, background, and sexual orientation. However, I do think that religion should have been acknowledged more because it plays such a big role in regards to this topic. Topic 9’s video on Modern Angst Loneliness and Medicalisation used statistics and data based on previous studies to show how depression and anxiety has effected millions of people worldwide. In my opinion, this video did the best job of using statistics to prove their point. Lastly Topic 10’s video on Happiness and Reflexivity showed how different types of people, of all ages, view themselves as happy in different ways. They go into detail by asking everyone what makes them happy and how they think the typical person should live in order to fulfill a happy life.

Liam Marsh said : Guest Report 3 months ago

I think that to some degree deviant behaviour is a choice as it allows one to feel emotions that they may not get from something else, the adrenaline rush from doing something wrong, there would be a feeling of power from not getting caught as Katz (1988) argues. However in some communities these deviant acts are sometimes a necessity to live, such as stealing food from a local supermarket as a means to survive. Deviant acts can also come from anger that hasn't been managed, such as riots, protests and even extreme cases of civil wars. Deviant acts are also used as acts of defiance towards stereotypes, racism and even legislation. There are many different reasons that people engage in deviant acts, all of them however can be traced back to feeling emotions such as boredom, anger and loneliness. When dealing with deviant acts it is important to not just look at the act that was carried out but dig deeper and find out why they chose to do what they did.

Alannah Talevski said : Guest Report 3 months ago

#S344UOW18 #Tut8 #Mon1430 Deviant behaviours as suggested by Katz appear seductive to an individual for the desire to feel emotions such as thrill, adrenaline and excitement, or in some cases so seek some kind of revenge driven by anger. This is further supported by Gould (2002) who examined juvenile crimes, particularly theft, and found that the main driver behind committing theft was for the purpose of 'self-enrichment'. The Cronulla Riots are a prime example of anger or thrill driven behaviours. Strong racial prejudice as well as feelings of anger and discrimination felt by the Anglo based Australians ended in retaliation which exacerbated the issue to become more violent and intense. In the case of the Cronulla riots, I believe that some individuals participated because they desired feelings of belonging and felt motivated by others who had similar, but more extreme beliefs. Other individuals may have been motivated solely on their own perceptions and beliefs which drove them to participate in the riots, or perhaps because they feared feeling shame or exclusion if they did not involve themselves.

Rachel Fatimawoods said : Guest Report 4 months ago

Individuals experience an internal sense of emotions, that is different for everyone. Each individual has actions that place with particular emotions, events and situations. This is also impacted by external factors which also provoke an individual to engage in an action. In 2005 Cronulla riots there was a large amount of racism that occurred which lead to this event. Knox (2011) attempted to justify such events, providing reasons of un education resulting in such behaviour. This is further suggested by Katz (1988) who depicts the impacts of ‘background force’ to criminal behaviour.  However, the forces that are behind an individual that encourage them to engage in criminal behaviour are complex and evolve many internal and external factors. Despite, what is seen to be the ‘right’ behaviour, many people feel the urge to express their emotions through actions which result in criminal behaviour at times.  #S344UOW18 #Tut8 #Mon1430

Rachel Fatimawoods said : Guest Report 4 months ago

Individuals experience an internal sense of emotions, that is different for everyone. Each individual has actions that place with particular emotions, events and situations. This is also impacted by external factors which also provoke an individual to engage in an action. In 2005 Cronulla riots there was a large amount of racism that occurred which lead to this event. Knox (2011) attempted to justify such events, providing reasons of un education resulting in such behaviour. This is further suggested by Katz (1988) who depicts the impacts of ‘background force’ to criminal behaviour.  However, the forces that are behind an individual that encourage them to engage in criminal behaviour are complex and evolve many internal and external factors. Despite, what is seen to be the ‘right’ behaviour, many people feel the urge to express their emotions through actions which result in criminal behaviour at times. #S344UOW18 #Tut8 #Mon1430

danielle east said : Guest Report 4 months ago

Deviance occurs as an act of negative drive with no forethought. The emotions that drive these act such as the Cronulla riots are passion but driven by an anger that erases any rational thought and regulated decency. It is all forgotten and only the way to react is deviance and negatively, added in the sense of comradery felt by others there a crowd quickly turns into an angry mob and escalates from there. The act of reacting in anger and violence is most commonly portrayed to be a male reaction because of the way their anger is physical and loud and quickly becomes more and more as they are pushed by others, it seems as if all reasoning is gone at times. All these feelings mix together to create uncertainly and confusion, therefore it is not known what the actual feeling should be but a strange combination that can be pushed to outburst any one of the many to portray the deviance.

jewel schwarz said : Guest Report 4 months ago

Deviance can be expressed in multiple ways, it is simply acting in opposition or going against the societal norms. Looking at Katz idea of the ‘seduction of crime’ people who act in these deviant ways do it for the thrill. I think this form of deviance in which people participate in theft or petty crimes is a combination of repression and anger. People engage in these crimes as an act of resistance and for the thrill of knowing that it is deviant. This form of deviance for some is empowering as they are rejecting societies rules as a form of resistance against society. Another form of deviance is more of a result of anger, fear, shame. I think a prime example of this can be seen with the Cronulla Riots, people fear what they don’t fully understand. There were many men who had xenophobic fears against people that didn’t look like the stereotypical Australian. They also had an irrational anger of people that did not look like them. I think these emotions combined and resulted in the deviant act of the riots. You have people with internalized shame and anger who then project it on a group labeled as ‘other.’ Often using people who have a physical difference in order to give reason as to why they chose to target that group, a visible stigma. I think there are various reasons why people choose to engage in deviant acts but most are rooted in negative emotions.

Abey Hatzantonis said : Guest Report 4 months ago

Deviant behaviour is behaviour that does not fit in with the way society expects individuals to behave and not behaving in the way society expects often has negative consequences. Sometimes individuals do bad things not because it feels good, but because they feel there is no other way to express the negative emotions that they are feeling and believe the only way to express that emotion is to do something negative. However by expressing this emotion it may lead the individual to feeling good as they may feel as though they were finally able to express how they were feeling. More so, some individuals simply perform deviant behaviours because they feel emboldened by the feelings of power and even the thrill of doing the wrong thing. Violent acts like the Cronulla riots is just one example of an expression of fear and shame that was supressed as these emotions could not be expressed within society (Hage 2009). Society tends to place a large amount of stress on the fact that deviant behaviours are unacceptable, hence why some individuals may participate in deviant behaviours to rebel against society as they may feel disconnected from society. These feelings of fear, anger, thrill and repression may lead to eventual feelings of shame, especially if they act out a deviant behaviour and then come to regret their acts. The Cronulla riots for example, I believe at the time the individuals involved experienced feelings of fear, anger, thrill and the repression of these emotions but once the riots were over I believe some individuals may have felt shame in acting in such a violent manner. #S344UOW18 #Tut8 #Mon1430

Matthew Rootes said : Guest Report 4 months ago

With the idea that ‘rules are meant to broken’ some individuals feel the need to break the status quo and act in a deviant manner. Katz (1988) discusses the seduction of crime using acts such as theft and vandalism as examples to explain the thrill felt by deviant individuals. Discussing the thrill of risk in stages, Katz (1988) explains the euphoria one can feel after realising that they got away with doing an act that defies the rules. Using a stolen pizza as an example, Katz states “It is not the taste for the pizza that leads to the crime; the crime makes the pizza tasty” (Katz 1988, p53). This quote explains that doing the crime itself isn’t the fun part, it’s the successful moments leading up to and after that make it worthwhile for some. Katz (1988) places emphasis on the fact that accomplishing one’s goal secretly is idealistic for a criminal. This show that most deviant individuals only have the ability to feel a true sense of shame once they have been caught or exposed. This shame is felt as their reputation or status in society is lessened due to acting in a frowned upon manner. #S344UOW18 #Tut8 #Mon1430

Allie Sims @AllieSoc said : Guest Report 4 months ago

Soc344-Deviant and Disembodied: Fearful Thrills Deviant behaviour can be for a number of reasons, but it is clear that one may gain an adrenaline rush, a certain thrill from doing something that they are not supposed to do. Katz’s first line states that young people are drawn to property crimes even though it has nothing to do with material gain or esteem from peers (Katz, 1988, p.52.) . This is apparent in my town as many of the youth are bored and so more something to do will trespass. There is one property in Mittagong called the Maltings which is an abandon Malt plant, this is a regular place for youth to go and climb around for the thrill of it. It is easy to access and not heavily policed. So while it is something illegal and it does carry risk with it, it is not a significant risk, for those wishing not to get into trouble but be a little more dangerous it is the place that they go. #S344UOW18 #Tut8 #Mon1430

Georgia Higgins said : Guest Report 4 months ago

Why do individuals act defiantly? What compels an individual to cause social harm to a community or individual? Is it a lack of compassion or moral integrity? Or is it because an individual thrives for the sensation of thrill? I personally believe and agree with Jack Katz work on the ‘Seductions of Crime’. Particularly his idea that individuals that participate in deviant behaviour are “emboldened by the power and thrill in doing the wrong thing”. Influential factors that contribute to an individual’s behaviour can include their lack of sociability – if an individual feels as though they are disconnected from society, they may feel the need to express deconstruction upon it. This note can be linked concisely to Jack Katz qualities of successful crimes. He believes that individuals participate in deviant behaviours for 1 to 3 qualities – • Ludic Quality – For the “fun’ of the game. • Sexual Quality – Rush, including build up and climate. • Defilement – Enjoying rubbishing the sacred. The qualities listed above exemplify the many reasons that individuals act out of character, lack a sense of integral morality and/or cause social harm. Regardless of why, when considering the ‘Seductions of Crime’ it is evident that individuals thrive for one sensation – thrill.

Lauren Wightman said : Guest Report 4 months ago

Not to condense the occurrence of deviance down in to one simple reason, as deviance is quite complex and involves various emotions, but I do think that the feeling of power that deviance gives is very important in its occurrence. In regards to smaller-scale deviance like graffiti or shoplifting, I think there is power in being able to deceive people and getting away with it. In evading being caught, deviants also evade shame - so it becomes thrilling. With regards to trolling, I believe that people may feel power in making other people feel angry, powerless or out of control of their own emotions. I think sometimes, more small-scale deviance such as shoplifting is not just for material necessity but simply for the thrill of it and perhaps even for attention. I can understand why people do engage in deviant acts, as they’re allowing their repressed selves/emotions to break free of the constraints society puts on us and the constraints we put on our selves to act ‘appropriately’ all the time. In regards to the Cronulla Riots, I think what occurred was a cycle of emotions such as anger, shame and hatred, which fed into each other over and over in a cycle of enmity. The Riots did not suddenly just occur out of the blue, there was already longstanding racial stigma against Muslims and Arab persons, especially after 9/11. As a result, these emotions of hatred, etc. reinforced what was already there and created a mob mentality, which led to mass movement.

Ursula Jones said : Guest Report 4 months ago

A lot of deviant behaviour occurs so an individual can feel a thrill and joy of acting against the behaviour that is expected of them. Jack Katz (1988) believes that when a crime has been successful an individual can feel joy from the fun of completing a crime and a thrill and excitement from the build-up and completion of the crime. Some people also feel powerful from being deviant and not getting caught. It is also believed that people act out because of boredom and alienation. Deviant behaviour can result in gaining attention and creating some sort of drama in their lives. There are many emotions that are connected with deviant behaviour and each individual can feel differently to others and can aim for a different emotion to occur when they behave defiantly.

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